London – Blitz 1941

The Old Bailey, London EC4M 7EH, UK

The Blitz was a German bombing campaign against Britain in 1940 and 1941, during the Second World War. The term was first used by the British press and is the German word for ‘lightning’.[4]

The Germans conducted mass air attacks against industrial targets, towns, and cities, beginning with raids on London towards the end of the Battle of Britain in 1940, a battle for daylight air superiority between the Luftwaffe and the Royal Air Force over the United Kingdom. By September 1940, the Luftwaffe had failed and the German air fleets (Luftflotten) were ordered to attack London, to draw RAF Fighter Command into a battle of annihilation.[5][6] Adolf Hitlerand Reichsmarschall Hermann Göring, commander-in-chief of the Luftwaffe, ordered the new policy on 6 September 1940. From 7 September 1940, London was systematically bombed by the Luftwaffe for 56 out of the following 57 days and nights.[7] Most notable was a large daylight attack against London on 15 September.

The Luftwaffe gradually decreased daylight operations in favour of night attacks to evade attack by the RAF, and the Blitz became a night bombing campaign after October 1940. The Luftwaffe attacked the main Atlantic sea port of Liverpool in the Liverpool Blitz and the North Sea port of Hull, a convenient and easily found target or secondary target for bombers unable to locate their primary targets, suffered the Hull BlitzBristolCardiffPortsmouthPlymouthSouthampton and Swansea were also bombed, as were the industrial cities of BirminghamBelfastCoventryGlasgowManchester and Sheffield. More than 40,000 civilians were killed by Luftwaffe bombing during the war, almost half of them in the capital, where more than a million houses were destroyed or damaged.[1]

In early July 1940, the German High Command began planning Operation Barbarossa, the invasion of the Soviet Union.[8] Bombing failed to demoralise the British into surrender or do much damage to the war economy; eight months of bombing never seriously hampered British war production, which continued to increase.[9][10] The greatest effect was to force the British to disperse the production of aircraft and spare parts.[11] British wartime studies concluded that cities generally took 10 to 15 days to recover when hit severely, but exceptions like Birmingham took three months.[11]

The German air offensive failed because the Luftwaffe High Command (Oberkommando der LuftwaffeOKL) did not develop a methodical strategy for destroying British war industry. Poor intelligence about British industry and economic efficiency led to OKL concentrating on tactics rather than strategy. The bombing effort was diluted by attacks against several sets of industries instead of constant pressure on the most vital.[11][12]

Bastogne, Belgium and the Battle of the Bulge

I would like to thank Mr. Henri Mignon for spending he day showing me a around the Bastogne area and sharing so many incredible stories and memories with me. It was an experience that stay with me for all my life.

Henri was borne on the Bulge battlefield in 1936 in Houffalize, close to Bastogne. He spent 6 years studying Greek and Latin in the “Petit Séminaire de Bastogne” which became the Headquarters of the 501st (101st Airborne) during the siege of Bastogne. Please visit  his website and contact him for a tour of more information: http://www.mardasson.com

Church in Village of Foy 1945 2019 Battle of the bulge Bastogne history then and now band of brothers Stephen AmbroseRecogne Near Bastogne Belium Battle of the bulge history then and now 1945-2019Bastone Barracks - HQ 101 Airborne Division Bastogne, Belgium 1945-2019

Newport, Rhode Island – Time Stands Still

Thames and Pelham Streets, Newport, RI 1895 & 2018. If you look closely you can see that most of the windows in the 1895 photos have been knocked out by a hail storm.
Thames and Pelham Streets, Newport, RI 1895 & 2018

The Old Colony House, also known as Old State House or Newport Colony House, is located at the east end of Washington Square in the city of NewportRhode IslandUnited States. It is a brick Georgianstyle building completed in 1741, and was the meeting place for the colonial legislature. From independence in 1776 to the early 20th century the state legislature alternated its sessions between here and the Rhode Island State House in Providence.

It has not been altered much since its construction. As one of the best-kept surviving Georgian public buildings in the United States from the colonial era, it was designated a National Historic Landmark (NHL) in 1960.[3] It is also a contributing property to the Newport Historic District, later designated an NHL itself. It is still owned by the state, but managed as a museum by the Newport Historical Society.

Besides its political and architectural importance, the building was the site of many important Revolutionary events in Rhode Island. George Washington[2] and Dwight Eisenhower have both been guests at the building. It has been used as a barrackshospitalcourthouse and a location for a Steven Spielberg film.

history then and now newport rhode island colony house washington square Jason Gardner

Dunbar Hospital, Detroit 1922 & 2018

Dunbar Hospital, Detroit 1922 & 2018

Below left, doctors and medical students pose in front of Dunbar Hospital, a converted house that was the first hospital in Detroit for its black residents. At a time when blacks could be denied healthcare at hospitals on account of their race, minority-owned and operated hospitals like Dunbar filled a critical need in the city. Dunbar Hospital would later move to a larger location in 1928, with the original building reverting back to a home and later becoming a museum.

Detroit was, and still is, one of the most segregated cities in America. Though blacks have lived in Detroit almost from its founding over 300 years ago, it wasn’t until the First World War that large numbers of black immigrants began to arrive in the city from the south, along with southern whites who sought jobs in the defense industry. What had been a fairly integrated city became stratified along racial lines, with the racial prejudices of many newly arrived southern whites and some Detroit residents dictating a social policy that saw the creation of separate neighborhoods, schools, hotels, and public services for black Detroiters. Dunbar Hospital

Old London and New

Tower Bridge – September 7, 1940 during the first mass daylight bombing of London
Tower Bridge - September 7, 1940.jpg
40 Bow Lane – London England 1920
40 Bow Ln London, England 1920
Fleet Street – London England 1924Fleet Street - London England 1924

Artillery Lane – London 1912
Artillery Lane - London, England 1912
Cheapside with St Mary le Bow – London 1909
Cheapside with St Mary le Bow London 1909Cheapside with St Mary Le Bow – London 1910Cheapside with St Mary Le Bow London 1910
Aldgate Pump 80 Leadenhall St. – London 1880Aldgate Pump 80 Leadenhall St 1880
Savoy Hotel Exeter St. – London 1900Savoy Hotel Exeter St London 1900
Frying Pan Alley on Sandys Row – London 1908
Frying Pan alley on Sandys Row 1908Seven Dials with The Crown Pub & Shops – London 1910Seven Dials with The Crown Pub & Shops1910

Oxford Arms Warwick Lane – London 1875Oxford Arms Warwick Lane - London 1875